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Voice Power Studios Blog

As the famous American song says, “Make someone happy and you will be happy too!” But making someone else happy just with the sound of your voice? Really? Yes, really and truly. When you convey happiness to others through the sound of your speaking voice it’s amazing how quickly that sound affects them. Your happy voice can give the momentary gift of hope to others and it is a powerful way to communicate confidence and inspire others to be confident as well.

“Voice has a lot to do with how we interact with each other,” Maraliz Campos, a certified sound practitioner and meditation instructor, tells Bustle. “One of the most immediate ways to influence the vagus nerve—the longest nerve of the autonomic nervous system that has both sympathetic and parasympathetic functions—is through auditory stimulation. Therefore, the sounds we hear have a direct impact on our stress levels causing us to gravitate to sounds and voices that are pleasurable.”

2020 brought substantial changes in many directions — personal and professional. But the ever-resilient business world adapted quickly. One major change, which seems to have stuck, is working from home. And a large part of that virtual workday involves communicating with coworkers and clients via business video-conferencing platforms such as Zoom and Google Meet.

Unless you are an A-list actor, though, you likely feel a bit self-conscious about being on video. You are hardly alone. A 2016 study by Highfive and Zobgy Analytics found that 59 percent of people feel more self-aware when on-camera than they do in their off-camera life at the office.

These days everyone is selling, negotiating, facilitating, mediating, and giving presentations on live video. Few things are more annoying than not being able to see or hear someone in a video conference.  But those small images and having everyone on mute with their cameras turned off make it difficult to assess audience response or to create audience interaction.

2020 brought substantial changes in many directions — personal and professional.  The ever resilient business world adapted quickly. One major change is continuing to work from home and communicating over recorded business video-conferencing platforms.

Unless you are an A-list actor, you likely feel a bit self-conscious about being on video. A 2016 study by Highfive and Zobgy Analytics found that 59 percent of people feel more self-aware when on-camera than they do in their off-camera life at the office.

These days everyone is selling, negotiating, facilitating, mediating and giving presentations on live video. Few things are more annoying than not being able to see or hear someone in a video conference.  Small images and having everyone on mute with their cameras turned off make it difficult to assess audience response or to create audience interaction.

My warmest wishes for good health and safety to everyone in the Voice Power Studios community. Phil never paid attention to his voice until he heard himself in a playback of a recent business call with his team. He was amazed that in comparison to his colleagues, his voice sounded weak and a little timid.

Can “executive presence be learned or does it just take years on the job to develop?” is a question I hear quite often….Yes! “Presence” can be learned and in a very short time

I know you recognize it when you see it in executives, actors, race car drivers, Olympic gymnasts, to name a few professions. However what is it really?